Archive for the ‘Application Delivery’ Category

DevOps and the Rise of Bimodal IT As enterprise IT begins to adopt DevOps practices, questions and issues emerge about how to best implement the culture, process, and tools to deliver on the promises of faster business innovation at a lower cost. How do you transform the current state? The Enterprise IT landscape is complex, sophisticated, dynamic, and frequently chaotic. Unlike Internet startups, you are

Serena Central - Your Serena community and marketplaceToday Serena Software launched our new community portal Serena Central which provides an enhanced user experience for customers and prospects looking to get the most out of their tools. The new site expands on our previous user communities focused around Build, Learn, and Connect.


We are still not there yet are we. The idea that IT is an “always on” utility, or better yet, a competitive advantage for the business.

Every year there are ton of examples illustrating that we still have a lot of work to do.  Whether it’s shutting down the Russian stock market for a couple of hours, deploying

toolchainOnce the developer checks in a change, how long does it take your organization to deliver it to the customer?  The path to production can take many turns, have many dips, and fall short in terms of quality and expectations.  IT organizations struggle with major process and toolchain gaps between develop, build, deploy, and release.  Come join us at the December Serena DevOps Drive-in as Julian

How does a developer know when they are done?.  soup.testing.001 How does a business know that their new application or feature does what the customer wants it to do? By testing. Testing is a cross functional activity that involves the whole team and should be done continuously from the beginning of the project. It serves as the gauntlet that a committed change has to run and pass in order to be considered worthy for release.  While testing is a major key ingredient


Like most jobs in life, preparation is the key to success. After getting to know the Serena Deployment Automation technology by working with the free version (download from the Serena website) for a few hours (see yesterday’s post) I decided it was time to try for real.

My application was a Library Management System I developed a while ago


A couple of weeks ago I wrote about downloading the new Serena Deployment Automation Appliance. This is the free, community edition of the exceptionally advanced Deployment Automation technology we introduced last year. You can get your own copy, free forever, at the community edition website.

The story so far

Since that post I have been working with the Appliance learning how to automate deployments. For about half an hour each day, for the past week, I have been pressing buttons,

“Drinking our own champagne” is how we approach technology here at Serena. If we have a our own tool that supports part of the application development lifecycle we use it for our own development efforts. In fact the Serena development teams deploy the beta versions of our solutions straight into their production environments because they want exploit the cool-new-stuff just as much as you do!

When I sat down today to start writing about automated deployment in modern enterprises I thought I’d follow the Serena mantra and “drink our own champagne” too. So I

(This is the conclusion of a 7-part series. Read part 1, part 2, part 3,

Myth: Errors happen: It’s software

Errors do occur. They occur for a reason. Often those reasons are out of our control. Someone changes an IP Address of a server. Someone changes the password to the back office system. Someone changes the name of a shared .DLL.

Of course in a well-managed and carefully controlled environment those kinds of things shouldn’t happen without the proper authentication, notification and approval. And the infamous “someone” is a responsible professional who calculates the impact of their changes and collaborates with everyone to minimize that impact. In a perfect world.

In the real world change is constant and calculating the consequences of change